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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

The following questions are commonly asked about family integrated churches and/or Legacy Baptist Church.    If you have additional questions or would like further clarification please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Family integration is the practice of families worshipping together during the worship service instead of being segregated.   We do not offer a separate Sunday school or children’s church. Families sing together, pray together, learn together, and grow together.

Additionally, we encourage family members to grow within their Biblically defined roles by providing specific teaching and opportunities to put into practice the lessons learned. It is this kind of family-based spiritual development that we believe enables families to live out the discipleship principles taught in Deuteronomy 6.

We believe that the Family Integrated model of worship is a more biblically accurate practice of God’s principles.   Discipleship starts at home.   Meeting as families models biblical patterns for our children to walk in.   Proper discipleship embraces the wisdom of the aged and facilitates the building up of multigenerational relationships.

Yes there will be challenges that our society has for some time covered up by sending small children to nursery and other age graded activities.  This idea has been fostered for so long it is seen as a normal but scripture and history shows quite the opposite.  There is also the feeling among many that since little children will receive little from the worship service they would be better served being somewhere else.

At LBC we readily adopt an “always reforming” attitude.  As Paul says in Ephesians, the old man must be put off and the new man in Christ must be put on.  One aspect of this is reconsidering family discipleship and worship.  Forming new habits and learning how to worship as a family may be a new way of thinking for many, but the long term benefits are well worth it.  Parents model proper worship for their children.   While the process will take patience and perseverance we at LBC are here to help, encourage and equip you.

We do not mind the cooing of babies, I am sure Jesus heard much of the same when he taught, and we also realize that there will be times when children will have to be removed for feedings.  When you read through scripture you find numerous instances where children are mentioned in the context of corporate gatherings (Deut. 31:12-13; Ezra 10:1; Matt. 18:1-5; 19:13-15; Eph. 6:1-4; Col. 3:20).

For children to see the head of the household participating in the worship of God is worth all of the effort and time that is taken.  Many in our culture see this as fruitless but we feel that anything that is called of from God will not be fruitless and thus worshipping as families will bring not only great joy to the family but also will be Christ exalting.

We believe that the primary responsibility for Biblical training has been given to heads of households, while age segregation tends to impede spiritual growth and negate the leadership of the head of household.  We are committed to training heads of households and their families together as a unit instead of disconnected individuals.  This training happens around the family dinner tables through the hospitality of the saints and is a natural outgrowth of dwelling together as the body of Christ.  In other words, do not be surprised when you get invited over to someone’s house for dinner and family worship.  It is a normal occurrence.

We want to encourage men to teach God’s Word daily in their homes (Eph 6:4, Deut 6:6-9). We also want to make sure that there are not so many activities in the life of the church so as to minimize the time the family needs to grow as God has designed it to grow.

It is our desire to impart a biblical vision to women which transcends the vanities of today’s feminism and egalitarianism.   The bible clearly shows women playing major roles in redemptive history such as Esther and the Proverbs 31 women in the Old Testament as well as the participation of women in the life and ministry of Jesus in the New Testament (some examples: I Sam 25:26-38, Gen 2:18, Eph 5:23, I Tim 2:12, 3:1-13, I Tim 5:14, Titus 2:3-5).

Several methods will be employed through both world missions and home missions. For world missions, we will support missionaries from other missionary sending agencies. We will also encourage our members to seek and fulfill God’s specific role for them in world missions. With regards to home missions, we will direct our efforts toward neighborhoods, family to family and workplace evangelism.

The work of evangelism in our homes (bringing the lost souls of our children to Christ), and in our neighborhoods will be a central focus of our equipping efforts, so that the head of the household is equipped to lead the family to evangelize friends and neighbors and co-workers. Through this equipping we will encourage our members to seek out those that God has providentially brought into their midst to share the Gospel.  We encourage our members to make their homes places of evangelism.

Decisions will be made through Biblically qualified elders. Leadership will be shared among a group of mutually accountable elders who will also seek congregational support for eldership decision making in key areas of church life.  Our present situation is such that our plurality of eldership consists of one elder from LBC and three elders from our sister church, Heritage Baptist, on the west side of Phoenix.

The primary role of elders is to come alongside heads of households and equip them in their primary ministry, to their families.  This will be done through expository preaching each Lord’s day and through discipling men as is required.

Youth are to be trained by their parents (Deuteronomy 6.1-10) and especially under the direction of their fathers (Ephesians 6.1-4).  If there are youth that do not have a church family we encourage our families to minister to them and bring them to church and to help in discipling them and in reaching out to their parents.

Morning worship starts at 10:00am.  The service includes worship in prayer, singing, and the proclamation of God’s word.  We also celebrate the Lord’s Supper each week. After every Lord’s day service we have a  Potluck meal which gives time for families and visitors to get to know each other.  This is also a good time for visitors to ask the pastor questions they may have about LBC.

We ask that those desiring to participate in the Lord’s Supper have surrendered their life to Jesus as their Lord and Savior, that you have made a public profession of faith and that you have been baptized by immersion.

Do your family discipleship focus (and emphasis on fathers) alienate singles/single moms?  Absolutely not!  In fact, the opposite is true.  This question has several underlying assumptions:

Assumption #1 – FIC Sermons Focus on ‘Families’

The truth is LBC is committed to ‘systematic exposition.’  In other words, we preach through the Bible systematically.  A consistent systematic exposition of God’s Word speaks to all believers in all walks of life, not merely the latest ‘hot topic.’ This way we teach “the whole council of God” and not just the latest hot topic.

Assumption #2 – The Family Discipleship Emphasis Excludes Singles

The truth is our emphasis on family discipleship is truly an emphasis on discipleship ‘in the home.’  Everyone lives in a home and should learn how to get into the word in that home whether they live alone or with a spouse and five children.  A “walk along, talk along” modeling takes place as a single is brought into a home and participates in the daily life of another discipling family.

Assumption #3 – The Emphasis on Traditional Families Alienates Single Mothers

The truth is children growing up in single parent homes need the same thing every other child needs. The FIC offers a place for single moms to expose their children to godly male role models who are doing and being exactly what she wants her children to become.  Single moms also have the benefit of a strong deacon ministry designed to minister to their special needs.

Assumption #4 – The Emphasis on Training Fathers Excludes Single Men

Fathers are not a separate, or special breed of man.  Fatherhood is simply a context in which biblical manhood is expressed.  The tools needed to be a godly husband and father are the same tools needed to be a godly man.  The FIC is about training men and women to thrive in their biblical roles whether they marry or not.

Assumption #5 – Singles Will Feel Pressured to Get Married

The truth is the high view of marriage at LBC is just as likely to elicit higher levels of caution in single adults considering marriage.  Our emphasis on biblical courtship, biblical manhood and womanhood, and multigenerational faithfulness means the bar is set high for marriage.  Thus, one could argue that there would be less pressure to just ‘get married.’  Although we would hope that a church filled with men and women striving to grow in grace and exemplify biblical marriage would ignite a godly desire for marriage in all those who have not been called by our Lord to a life of singleness.

We encourage all families to bring their children into the sanctuary.  Cooing babies don’t bother us one bit.  We recognize that some infants will need to be taken out for feedings, etc., and we have no problem with that.  however, we do not provide a nursery.  The Bible frequently mentions children in the context of the corporate gathering of God’s people (Deut. 31:12-13; Ezra 10:1; Matt. 18:1-5; 19:13-15; Eph. 6:1-4; Col. 3:20).  Moreover, we believe it is important for children to worship with their parents, and to be taught how to sit through the service .

Nurseries tend to hide problems that need to be corrected.  Children who cannot sit through a service need training and discipline, not isolation.  Moreover, if these children cannot sit through the service, they are probably giving their parents fits at home (thus their desire to dump them off at the nursery on Sunday morning).  We patiently teach inexperienced families how to walk with their children through this process and it blesses their home, their marriage, their relationship with their children and the testimony of the church.

Unfortunately, this is normal.  True biblical discipleship is a rarity in the modern American church.  Rare is the family headed by a godly father who actually sees discipleship as his responsibility.  Rarer still is the man who is equipped for the task.  As a result, this is a very real issue that must be addressed.

At LBC, we rely on catechism as a discipleship tool.  As a result, we tell our men, “You only have to be a day ahead.”  A man who is catechizing his children is also catechizing himself.  Moreover, a man who is encouraged and expected to lead in family worship on a regular basis will be transformed in a very short time into something he never knew he could be:

As they pray for each other their mutual love is strengthened. Reading and memorizing Scripture and the catechisms of the church results in incredible development of children, both spiritually and intellectually. What families regard as important is evidenced by the manner in which they spend their time. Therefore, regular family worship shows the children that their parents believe that Jesus Christ is central to all of life. This practice leaves a legacy that will benefit thousands in generations to come.

Men must be challenged.  They must have mountains to climb; foes to conquer.  The FIC says to men, “Here is your challenge… go make disciples in your home.  No one is going to do it for you.  You simply must get it done.”  We offer help, encouragement, accountability and training.  But it is ultimately up to our men to get the job done (Deuteronomy 6:4-15; Ephesians 6:1-4).

This issue is a product of the youth ministry structure.  The reason most youth ministries are filled with unchurched teens from unchurched families is that the structure attracts teens and not families.  As a result, this phenomenon is unusual in FIC circles.  We rarely see unattached teens.  However, when we do, there are several differences in the way we proceed.

First, the FIC model promotes inter-generational fellowship.  Thus, teens who come to our church will likely have come with a family who has shown them hospitality and not with other teens who know them in isolation.  As a result, the FIC model presents a ready-made environment for inter-generational interaction.

Second, at LBC we believe teens are young men and women, not big children.  Thus, we believe the most important relationships they can have are not those with other teens, but with older adults.  Teens will rise to the level of behavior expected of them.  If we place them in a room filled with carnal teens, they are not likely to mimic the behavior of responsible adults.

Finally, teens from non-Christian homes need their parents to be reached and influenced.  Because the FIC model involves these teens in meaningful relationships with families, there is a natural connection between families in our church who are ministering to the teen and the family who needs to be reached with the gospel.